Mongolia

Articles about voting issues in Mongolia.

Mongolia: A Crucial Week In Mongolia | Forbes

It appears that President Elbegdorj has gotten his way and former President Enkhbayar will not be able to stand in the parliamentary elections this coming Thursday. Enkhbayar’s appeal to the Constitutional Court will not be heard until tomorrow, a mere two days before the election. At that point, the Constitutional Court will decide whether or not to even accept and review his petition. With the way things have been handled thus far, Enkhbayar will not be a candidate for his Mongolian People’s Revolutionary Party. One would think that corrupting the democratic process to this point would be enough, but the current Mongolian government has gone even further. The Sukhhbaatar District Court has ruled that Enkhbayar cannot leave the city until his trial thereby preventing him from campaigning for his party in the countryside, Elbegdorj’s homeland.

Full Article: A Crucial Week In Mongolia - Forbes.

Mongolia: Mongolian elections mark key step on democratization road | Vancouver Sun

Depending on whom one believes, Mongolia’s former president Nambaryn Enkhbayar is either a champion of democracy targeted for judicial persecution by an increasingly authoritarian regime or he is a corrupt charlatan whose finely crafted portrayal of martyrdom hoodwinked Washington, the United Nations and the European Union. The evidence suggests the second view is nearer the truth and Mongolia’s Constitutional Court has upheld a General Election Commission ruling that because Enkhbayar, president from 2005 to 2009, is facing five corruption charges, he is not eligible to run in parliamentary elections on June 28. That ruling has stalled and perhaps ended Enkhbayar’s attempts at a political comeback after his defeat in the 2009 presidential election.

Full Article: Manthorpe: Mongolian elections mark key step on democratization road.

Mongolia: Ex-Leader Says Election Decision ‘Illegal’ | The Jakarta Globe

Mongolia’s former leader Nambar Enkhbayar said Tuesday a decision barring him from running in upcoming elections was “illegal”, as his corruption trial was postponed for the third time. Enkhbayar — who had planned to run in parliamentary polls on June 28 before being barred from doing so last week — faces five counts of graft dating back to his time as prime minister and president of the impoverished country. But on Tuesday his first hearing was postponed for the third time after he complained of not having enough time to go over the case files and because his lawyer had left the city. “The election committee denied my application to be a candidate. That was illegal so I gave a letter to the Constitutional Court to reconsider my candidacy for the election,” he told reporters outside court in Ulan Bator.

Full Article: Mongolia’s Ex-Leader Says Election Decision ‘Illegal’ | The Jakarta Globe.

Mongolia: Former Mongolia President Ineligible for Election | WSJ.com

Former Mongolian President Enkhbayar Nambar said he has been deemed ineligible to stand in this month’s parliamentary elections, in the latest setback to his attempted political comeback at a time when fresh questions are being asked about the nation’s democratic foundations. In an interview Thursday, Mr. Enkhbayar said the General Election Commission of Mongolia informed him it wouldn’t accept his application to participate in the June 28 election due to a pending corruption case against him and after consultation with state prosecutors. Mr. Enkhbayar, who served as president from 2005 until 2009, denies the corruption allegations and said he intends to challenge the commission’s decision. Messages left with the commission weren’t returned.

Full Article: Former Mongolia President Ineligible for Election - WSJ.com.

Mongolia: Corruption Trial of Enkhbayar Postponed | NYTimes.com

As he prepared to go on trial on corruption charges, the former president of Mongolia lay in a wrinkled hospital bed, where he was recovering from a 10-day hunger strike he waged to protest being held in detention by his successor’s government. Gaunt, barefoot and dressed in hospital-issue white pajamas, the former president, Nambaryn Enkhbayar, bore little resemblance to the populist leader who dominated Mongolian politics until he was defeated in 2009 by Tsakhia Elbegdorj, who now runs the country. But even in his apparently frail state, Mr. Enkhbayar angrily dismissed the charges against him in an interview on Wednesday, and criticized the timing of the trial as a ploy to remove him from the political arena just weeks before parliamentary elections. “If this is a political case, let’s do it now,” he said in fluent English. “But if we live in a real democratic country, and this is not just political theater, let’s take more time.”

Full Article: Mongolia Postpones Corruption Trial of Enkhbayar - NYTimes.com.

Mongolia: Jailing Complicates Mongolia Election | WSJ.com

The unusual detention of Mongolia’s former president could last until the eve of next month’s elections, throwing into doubt his political comeback and dealing a setback to what had been considered a relatively healthy democratic system. Enkhbayar Nambar was jailed last month on allegations he illegally profited in office. Last week, a judge extended the detention by two months, until days before June 28 parliamentary elections in which Mr. Enkhbayar planned to run. Mr. Enkhbayar on Friday sent messages to supporters gathered outside the prison in which he pledged to protest his detention by ingesting only liquids, according to his attorney and family members. They said they have had only limited access to the 53-year-old, and worry that his health is failing.

Full Article: Jailing Complicates Mongolia Election - WSJ.com.

Mongolia: Jailing Complicates Mongolia Election | WSJ.com

The unusual detention of Mongolia’s former president could last until the eve of next month’s elections, throwing into doubt his political comeback and dealing a setback to what had been considered a relatively healthy democratic system. Enkhbayar Nambar was jailed last month on allegations he illegally profited in office. Last week, a judge extended the detention by two months, until days before June 28 parliamentary elections in which Mr. Enkhbayar planned to run. Mr. Enkhbayar on Friday sent messages to supporters gathered outside the prison in which he pledged to protest his detention by ingesting only liquids, according to his attorney and family members. They said they have had only limited access to the 53-year-old, and worry that his health is failing.

Full Article: Jailing Complicates Mongolia Election - WSJ.com.

Mongolia: Democrats quit coalition ahead of poll | Associated Press

The Democratic Party of Mongolia announced Thursday that it plans to quit the governing coalition, in maneuvering ahead of elections likely to center on how the poor country can better distribute wealth from a recent mining boom. The Democratic Party’s withdrawal, if finalized, still leaves the dominant Mongolian People’s Party with a majority in parliament, so the move is unlikely to affect the workings of the government. But it presages bruising elections for parliament and local councils in June.

Full Article: Mongolian Democrats quit coalition ahead of poll: Associated Press Business News - MSN Money.