The Voting News Daily: 7/24 Voting News. Cost of Ditching Levers, Texas Vote Centers, Internet Voting, Better Way to Register Voters

Levers, Vote Centers, Voter Registration and Internet Voting in the news today. Voters Unite has a new report on the costs of replacing lever machines with optical scanners. The report finds that the HAVA funds will not cover the first year costs of switching to the Sequoia/Dominion ImageCast. The New York Times has an article…

The Voting News Daily: Voting News 7/23 Hawaii Elections Office is broke, Major advocacy groups release report on 2008 election, election bills gain sponsors

Hawaii’s top election official may need to borrow money to hold elections in 2010 because of state budget restrictions. Lots of US news. Is there a better alternative to election day registration? Several election bills add new co sponsors as there is a big push for electoral reform by 2010. US. Voter Action, NAACP National…

The Voting News Daily: New York voting machines roll, Tennessee ballot pleas, Voting Rights in Wisconsin, IRV in news in 2 cities

The Ohio Secretary of State has just certified the new ES&S’s optical scanner, the DS200 and it is already heading to Cuyahoga County. The DS200 was just certified by the EAC to the 2002 Voting System Standards, the most current in effect by the EAC. Voter Action’s lawsuit over Arizona’s touchscreen machines is back in…

The Voting News Daily: Protecting Tennessee’s vote:Rebutting Giannini’s “Optical Scan Voting Insanity” rhetoric

The facts are NOT on the side of partisan election official Chairman Bill Giannini of Shelby County Tennessee. Mr. Giannini uses the same misinformation and inflammatory rhetoric that we in North Carolina had to disprove when special interests tried to thwart our paper ballot law. Jul 21, 2009 Optical Scan Voting “Insanity,” Says Election Commission…

The Voting News Daily: 7/21 Voting News. New Mexico SOS can’t protect assets, Arizona’s voting machine suit in court, Tennessee paper fight rages, EAC certification

Can New Mexico’s Secretary of State protect elections? The New Mexico Secretary of State’s Office doesn’t have the technical capability to manage information technology projects, or “protect the assets of the SOS and the people of the State of New Mexico.” according to a Legislative Finance Committee (LFC) evaluation.The EAC announces several certifications of software…

The Voting News Daily: 7/20/2009 War over paper in Tennessee, New Mexico may ditch ES&S, Undervotes in 08,

Tennessee has 5 different election cases pending in Federal Court, which may be more than any other state. Meanwhile, Tennessee lawmaker Gary Odom’s oped today states that the law doesn’t require 2005 system guidelines and Tennessee should use federal HAVA funds to purchase paper ballot/machines now. Meanwhile Tennessee SOS Hargett claims that the law requires…

The Voting News Daily: 7/16/2009 Voting News. Tenn response to response,MN Lessons learned, Canada company gets NY voting machine contract

“Tennesseans deserve to know that their votes will be counted and counted correctly in 2010.” – TN Rep Gary Odom. Tennessee officials claim it is impossible to implement the paper ballot law on time. NC was able to do this because they have highly organized and competent election officials. Rep Gary Odom (TN)also advises that…

The Voting News Daily: Tennessee paper ballot fight heats up, Indiana makes it harder to vote, lawsuit in WA over secret ballot

Tennessee fight brouhau gets wild with one county threatening a lawsuit, state’s GOP chair asks Democrats to recraft paper ballot law, and the SOS fights back using state rep’s own words, Indiana setsnew Drivers license requirements that will make it even harder to vote there. New York will not have undervote notification on machines. A…

Verified Voting Blog: Internet Voting – Not as Easy as You Think

Recently the Huffington Post published an article about Hawaii’s recent Internet and phone-based elections (“America’s Newest State Holds America’s Newest Election“). The article presents an optimistic and patriotic view of the Everyone Counts (E1C) election system that allows voters to cast their ballots from their home computers or over the phone. It was written by E1C executive Aaron Contorer and is effectively a marketing piece for E1C that exaggerates the scope of the election, overlooks or insults other election methods, and glosses over the formidable technical challenges and dangers posed by the electronic submission of voted ballots.

The election in Honolulu was for neighborhood board members, and thus was not covered by Hawaii’s public election laws. That matters because Hawaii’s election laws, fortunately, require a voter-verified paper ballot and a post-election hand audit of a percentage of these ballots. Since such verification and audits are impossible with a purely Internet-based voting system, there is no legal way to use the E1C system under current Hawaii state law. Nevertheless, because this small election is being used to promote Internet voting generally, and because Internet voting schemes are being proposed across the United States, the issue demands thorough discussion. In response to multiple efforts to allow voting over the Internet in major elections, many of our nation’s prominent technology experts have signed a statement cautioning against adopting Internet-based voting systems without first understanding and guarding against the numerous and well-documented dangers. This is not because, as Mr. Contorer suggests, those opposing Internet voting find “[t]he introduction of technology to any process … scary”. The signatories to this statement are not at all intimidated by technology; in fact many are established experts in voting systems who are most certainly aware of the major risks associated with Internet voting.